The Data science education panel on ICDE 2017

In order to keep up with my own promises to tell more about what was happening on ICDE 2017 I am going to write about the panel on data science education. The panel was called “Data Science Education: We’re Missing the Boat, Again”, and I’d say it was probably the most interesting panel I’ve ever attended! By the time the panel was about to start, there was a huge crowd, and people were encouraged to take a dozen of remaining seats in the first and second rows (do I need to mention that I was at the front five minutes before the panel started?)

The topic of the panel described in my own words was the following. The Data science is a buzz word, students want to be taught “data science”, and there is a common believe that data science is about machine learning and statistical modeling while in reality 80% of time of the data scientists is spent on data pre-processing, cleansing, etc.

The panelists were given the questions which I am copying below.

If data scientists are spending 80% of their time grappling with data, what are they doing wrong? What are we doing wrong? What can we teach them to reduce this cost?
• What should a practicing data scientist learn about sys- tems engineering? What’s the difference between a data engineer and a data scientist?
• Scale is at the heart of what we do, and it’s a daily source of friction for data scientists. How can we teach funda- mental principles of scalability (randomized algorithms, for example) in the context of data systems?
• Perhaps data scientists are just consumers of our technol- ogy — how much do they really need to know about how things work? Empirically, it appears to be more than we think. There is a black art to making our systems sing and dance at scale, even though we like to pretend everything happens automatically. How can we stop pretending and start teaching the black art in a principled way?
• How can we address emerging issues in reproducibility, provenance, curation in a principled yet practical way as a core part of data engineering and data systems? Consider that the ML community has a vibrant workshop on fairness, accountability, and transparency. These topics are at least as relevant from a database perspective as they are from an ML perspective, maybe more so. Can we incorporate these issues into what we teach?
• How much math do we need to teach in our database- oriented data science courses? How can we expose the underlying rigor while remaining practical for people seeking professional degrees?

Bill Howe from UW was a moderator and the first panelist to give his talk.

The second one was Jeff Ullman, and thereby I have nothing more to say:)

Actually, i really liked the fact that he mentioned, that the math courses, linear algebra and calculus should be included into the Database curriculum.  I was always saying that nobody without Calc  BC should be allowed anywhere near any database.

The next panelist was Laura Haas, and again – what else I need to say, except of I’ve enjoyed each and every moment of her presentation?

One thing from her presentation which I find really important is that the Data science is not a part of the Computer Science, and not a part of Database management.  As Laura put it, “we provide the tools”, but not like “we” should teach the DS as a part of CS.

Next panelist was Mike Franklin from UC, and I hope this picture is clear enough for you to see a funny example of DS he is showing.

And the last one was very controversial Tim Kraska from Brown, who started with “he is going to disagree with all the rest of panelists” – and he did.

To be honest, it’s very difficult to write about this panel, because each of you can google all these great people, but you would need to see a video recording of this panel to really fell how interesting, and how much fun it was.

After the panel I talked to several conference participants, who like me are from industry and asked them what are they looking for when hiring recent grads. And literally everybody said the same thing that I was thinking about: they said they hire smart people with solid basic education, people who can solve problems, “and we will teach them all the rest”. Which I couldn’t agree more!

Paradoxically, the students think it’s cool to have something about “Data science” in their curriculum, they often think it will make them more marketable, but real future employers do not care that much!

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