Tag Archives: conferences

The second rejected paper

****Reposting because the previous version didn’t get  shared on LinkedIn****

Object-relational impedance mismatch is by far my favorite research topic, mostly due to the fact that it has a very practical implementation. I would make even stronger statement: the most rewarding optimization is the one when you can reduce the number of SQL statements executed when a web page is rendered and all of a sudden it is loaded 50 times faster (and I mean actually 50 times, not figuratively speaking!).  It always looks like a magic – and I haven’d done anything!

This been said, the ORMs are my worst enemies, and I am always looking for opportunities to promote the better ways of communication between a database and an applications. Most of the time the human factor appears to be more important than the technological challenges, so I always think about these projects as battles.

At Braviant however, first time in my professional career I had nobody to fight about this issue – the app developers were completely on board with my approach since day one. Which allowed us to develop something really cool, and to optimize the interaction between databases and application to the point of absolute perfection. SO, when my husband suggested we’d write a short paper about this project, I had no doubt it will be accepted – because two of my previous papers on the same subject were accepted to the very serious conferences.

Life proved me wrong :), I am not going to name the conference and the workshop, but I have to make some comments about the reviews, so that the level of my frustration can be understood.

One of the reviewers asked: why we think that the number of round trips defines the response time of the web application. Another reviewer asked, whether we tried to use Mongo DB :))). And why we think that (de) serialization of the JSON takes negligible time. And why we think Hibernate is worse.

I think the only valid objection was, that the topic of the paper is not relevant to the workshop topic.  And the latter might explain the whole story.

Several years ago, when I started to attend the database conferences again, after fifteen years of absence, I made an observation that a significant number of the attendees never saw the real applications, and never had deal with performance problems, Fortunately, I’ve also met and got to know some really outstanding researches, whom I admire and feel honored to be aquatinted with, so… I am sure I will find the right place to showcase our work.

And may be it’s time to get back to my old “HDAT” workshop idea,,,

And for my fellow Chicagoans: I will be presenting this work this Tuesday, Feb 13 at the Chicago PUG meetup!

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The second rejected paper: the ORIM again

Object-relational impedance mismatch is by far my favorite research topic, mostly due to the fact that it has a very practical implementation. I would make even stronger statement: the most rewarding optimization is the one when you can reduce the number of SQL statements executed when a web page is rendered and all of a sudden it is loaded 50 times faster (and I mean actually 50 times, not figuratively speaking!).  It always looks like a magic – and I haven’d done anything!

This been said, the ORMs are my worst enemies, and I am always looking for opportunities to promote the better ways of communication between a database and an applications. Most of the time the human factor appears to be more important than the technological challenges, so I always think about these projects as battles.

At Braviant however, first time in my professional career I had nobody to fight about this issue – the app developers were completely on board with my approach since day one. Which allowed us to develop something really cool, and to optimize the interaction between databases and application to the point of absolute perfection. SO, when my husband suggested we’d write a short paper about this project, I had no doubt it will be accepted – because two of my previous papers on the same subject were accepted to the very serious conferences.

Life proved me wrong :), I am not going to name the conference and the workshop, but I have to make some comments about the reviews, so that the level of my frustration can be understood.

One of the reviewers asked: why we think that the number of round trips defines the response time of the web application. Another reviewer asked, whether we tried to use Mongo DB :))). And why we think that (de) serialization of the JSON takes negligible time. And why we think Hibernate is worse.

I think the only valid objection was, that the topic of the paper is not relevant to the workshop topic.  And the latter might explain the whole story.

Several years ago, when I started to attend the database conferences again, after fifteen years of absence, I made an observation that a significant number of the attendees never saw the real applications, and never had deal with performance problems, Fortunately, I’ve also met and got to know some really outstanding researches, whom I admire and feel honored to be aquatinted with, so… I am sure I will find the right place to showcase our work.

And may be it’s time to get back to my old “HDAT” workshop idea,,,

And for my fellow Chicagoans: I will be presenting this work this Tuesday, Feb 13 at the Chicago PUG meetup!

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Our bitemporal paper was rejected, and how I feel about it

Actually, this winter I had not one, but two papers rejected. And although I never dispute the rejections (it just means I failed to present my work adequately), I wanted to reflect on why both papers were rejected, and what I can do to make them accepted to other conferences.

With our bitemporal paper I was really upset that it didn’t make it to ICDE 2018, because I know that the work itself was magnitudes better than the work, which was accepted for ICDE 2016. Which leaves me with two options: either the topic was not relevant for the Industrial track, or we didn’t present our work well enough, so that it’s novelty would be visible.

I think its’ more that we didn’t explain ourselves well enough. I was trying not to dedicate 1/3 of the paper to  explaining the theory which lays underneath our implementation, and now I think it was a mistake. I didn’t elaborate on the fact, that our second dimension is asserted time, not system time, and what is a semantical difference. So when our our reviewers are saying – “everybody have bitemporal time” – yes, that’s correct, but our two-dimensional time  is different!

I know that the “asserted time” concept is not that easy to grasp when you read about it for the first time, and we didn’t provide any formal definitions. Nor did we provide any formal definitions for the bitemporal operations. It does not matter, that we’ve followed the asserted versioning framework bible… We should have give the formal definitions, and we should have highlighted, that it’s not “bitemporal implementation for Postgres”, but that “we use Postgres to implement the asserted versioning framework, because Postgres has some cool features, which makes it easier”.

Oh, well. There is always a next conference :). Also, I think we should separate this paper into smaller pieces – this one was an attempt to summarize three years of development.

Something to work on! And also – to continue development of the bitemporal library itself.

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2Q PG Conf 2017 in Chicago

This conference took place here in Chicago on November 9, and I just loved everything about it! I will try not to repeat myself, since I’ve already mentioned about a million times what a great idea is it to have a one-day conference which is geared towards the local Postgres users. I am not sure to which extent I really helped this conference to be a success (although the organizers firmly believe I did!), but in any case it turned out ot be exactly what I was hoping it to be.

Great venue, great talks (and I do not mean mine :))

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One more reminder – two Postgres event in Chicago next week!

To my friends and colleagues in Chicago: I’ve written about both of those events multiple times, but now they are really coming.

First, Chicago PUG meetup will take place on November 8, with Bruce Momjian’s appearance! Your chance to listen to the “Postgres Window Magic” presentation! Please don’t forget to RSVP, if you are planing to come.

And second, or rather first, since that’s the reason Bruce Momjian is in town – the 2QPGConf. I can’t stress enough what a great opportunity it is for anybody who does anything with PostgreSQL it is! The best speakers of the Postgres community are on the list of presenters.

I am presenting as well:) – the shorted version on the bitemporal paper. Also, I will be one of the panelist on the panel “Postgres Around the Windy City”. This should be something interesting, because – well, you know that I like to talk 🙂

Hope to see you there!

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ACT-W Conference: Dr. Helen Sun keynote

Dr. Sun keynote was definitely the best thing out of the whole conference! The talk was called “My Personal Journey and Transformation Story”. To be honest ], my first reaction when I heard about switching career from the English professor to the information technology was rather skeptical, but the more I listened to the talk the more I started to realize how close is it to what I believe in, and what I consider the most important things in life and professional career. I find it very true what Dr. Sun said about the leadership. She cites the quote from Bob Gates that “Leadership is when people choose to follow
you, even if there’s no consequences of not doing so”.

But the most interesting thing happened at the very end of the talk. Dr. Sun said: if somebody will be talking to you about work-life balance, do not believe them. There is no such a thing as a work life balance. It can only be a work-life integration!

And that was the word! For many years, when I was telling people my personal story, and when I was telling young women seeking a career in IT: you do not have to choose between work and family, you can have them both if you set up your mind accordingly. But the word “integration” never crossed my mind and yet it describes perfectly how I feel about this subject.

And then Dr. Sun continued, talking about how she always would make a point to talk to her son on Skype every day when she was away on business trips, and about tons of other things that she did. and most of them would be exactly what I did. And what she said about her son not being upset, that she often could attend his events, and that he was proud of her, and how she gave him a positive example – I could say it about my kids, word to word.

So when she was finished, I raised my hand for a question, and told her how much I’ve enjoyed her presentation, and thanked her for giving me that word – work-life integration, and told her how my life journey resembled her’s.

And I think she was really glad to hear that 🙂

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The PG Open videos

Actually, all the videos from the conference are now available online, which is great. But for those, who are as lazy as me :), I am posting here both my and Chad’s presentations – enjoy!

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