Tag Archives: conferences

PG Conf NYC 2020 reminder!

For those who are considering attending PG Conf NYC 2020: the last Day of the EarlyBird discount is January 31! The program (or at least most of it:)) is up, so you can decided which day(s) you want to attend in can’t make it for the whole week. There will be tons of interesting talks, I am already upset I won’t be able to be it three different rooms at the same time 🙂

For those who is interested in my presentations, here is the most complete information so far:

  • Boris and I will be doing the same Ultimate Optimization Training as we presented in Chicago in December. The even was sold out than, but it is not sold out yet in NYC :). Our training will be on the last day of the conference, Friday March 27
  • I will be presenting the talk about building local communities (specifically, how to build a Postgers User Group) on the second day of the conference
  • I won’t be presenting neither bitemporal library, nor NORM, but I was invited to talk at another event during the same week, where I will present the NORM talk (extended from my Cyprus presentation). I will publish all the details as soon as it will be finalized

Once again – there will be an amazing number of interesting presentations, and many experienced people to talk to (I already have a list of twenty:)), so please consider attending!

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More on our Presentation at SOFSEM 2020: NORM Goest Live!

My friends and colleagues who follow me for a while are well aware of the fact that my papers about ORIM/ORM were rejected at several conferences. Also, it’s a known fact that this kind of submissions is not welcomed at the conferences in general. My recent work, which was implemented at Braviant Holding with what I would call a smashing success, was only presented at the Postgres conferences. Our three attempts to submit it to any CS/Academic conferences failed. At some point, it became a matter of principle.


We submitted the new version to SOFSEM 2020 in the hope that at DB/SE conference, the topic could feel more appealing. The submissions formate required us to reduce the size of the paper almost twice, but we were still hopeful we would be able to convey a message.
That ended up being only a partial success. The paper was accepted, however, only as a short paper. Reading the reviews, we realized that none of the reviewers understood what it was about (in fact, we got much better reviews fro VLDB, were we got weak accept, which ended up being not enough). To make the paper even shorter, we had to remove all the actual work from the body:), leaving there only the motivation and the conclusion. But as I said, it was the matter of principle.

Then we spend quite a bit of time reworking the presentation. First, Boris wanted it to look more academic, that my older Postgres presentations. But then we started to change it back to more and more visual since we realized that the topic, the motivation, and the reality are pretty much unknown to our audience. Besides, my Postgres presentations were 40-50 minutes long, and here we had only 30 minutes, including questions. I tried very hard to get it to 23-25 minutes.

The last blow came two days before the conference when we were told that the presentations for short papers should be 18 minutes long, including questions, which meant I had only 15 minutes to present. That did not sound feasible, and we were desperate. Boris tried to negotiate our twelve minutes back with the organizers:).

But then a sort of miracle happened. Right before our session began, it turned out that the first person didn’t show up, and I claimed all the time I could. Unfortunately, I already cut several slides out of my presentation (I put them pack in the pdf, which I previously published here). After all, I was able to bring my point across, and I think that everybody present there, enjoyed the presentation. How I wish I won’t be presenting on the first day because then I `would convince more people to come. But in any case, I hope that now we will be able to publish a full version of the paper somewhere.

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Next Ultimate Optimization Training is Coming Up in March

For those who didn’t get a chance to get to our Ultimate Optimization Training in December: we are doing it again at PG Conf New York March 23-27. This is definitely not the only reason to attend the conference, but somewhat an extra bonus :). Please go to the conference page for the details: PG Conf 2020

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2019 Highlights

Today, on the first day of 2020, I am looking back at 2019 – what an amazing year it was for me! Here is what I am especially happy and proud about:

  1. Undiubtfully, the most outstanding professional recognition I ever received was my ITA Technologist of the year award.  What made it especially significant for me was the fact that I ended up being the first female ever receiving this award. 
  2. After three years of rejections, I finally have another paper accepted for the academic conference. I will be presenting at SOFSEM 2020 in Cyprus
  3. I ran a full-day training for the first time in my life, at 2Q PG Conf in Chicago. That was way more work than I initially thought, but I am pleased with the outcome. 
  4. Also for the first time, I was a part of the talk selection committee (for the same conference) 
  5. It was also a fantastic year for the Chicago PUG. We are now the third-largest PUG in the Western Hemisphere, and I can’t wrap my head around it. When did it happen?! I am so thankful for all of the Chicago PUG members who were attending our meetups this year! Huge thank you for all the speakers, who made our year so memorable, especially our November Meetup!
  6. Last but not least: it is my fourth year at Braviant Holdings, and this is the first time in my life I can design and build the system from scratch, the way I believe is right, and to prove that it is indeed the right way – works as expected 🙂 Also, I am working with the most wonderful team ever. 

The only thing I can wish for myself in 2020 – for things to continue to be as good as they are. Also, I have two announcements to make. 

  1. For those of you who wanted to attend my training but didn’t get a chance – I will do it again in New York at the end of March. More details to come, stay tuned.
  2. I am looking for ways to further improve Chicago PUG meetups. Some people expressed a desire to have “PG lunches” in addition to the evening meetups. If you are interested and want/can help with the organization – please reach out to me!

One more time, big thank you to everybody: my co-workers, my managers, Chicago PUG, and Postgres community at large – nothing would happen without your continuous support!

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2Q PG Conf Follow-Up

The 2Q PG CONF 2019 is over, and I can’t stress enough how much it meant for me!

First to mention, the third year in a row a conference was a success, and I hope that the conference organizers feel the same! I wanted to thank the 2nd Quadrant for having this conference in Chicago, and to thank all the participants who attended. Same as for the previous two years I ran an advertising campaign for the conference, and my hopes are that now the Chicago Postgres community has this conference on their calendars and will continue to contribute.

For me, it was the first time I conducted a whole-day training; usually, the material we covered is delivered in 3-4 separate sessions. I am thrilled that the training was full, and nobody switched to a different session in the middle:). Also, that was the first time in 30+ years that Boris and I did the training together, and we survived this experience:). 

I was uncertain whether it makes sense to have yet another bitemporal talk, but it was very well received and looked like much needed. 

Also, I had a lot of interesting conversations and new connections. 

A word to all the conference participants as well as to those who for some reason, could not make it:

  • I am looking for volunteers to try bitemporality in the real-life environment, and I promise continuous support!
  • I am looking for potential collaborators to make NORM (No ORM framework) to the Postgres extension
  • If you are in Chicago and not a Chicago PUG member – please consider joining
  • If you are interested in my Ultimate Performace training – please contact me!
  • If you didn’t have a chance to ask me a question you wanted to ask during the conference – please contact me!

Yes, I am busy, but if you never submit your request to the queue, I will never know you have one!

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2Q PG Conf in Chicago – It’s Getting Closer!

Dear fellow Chicagoans! I just shared a LinkedIn post by 2ndQuadrant – the Early Bird registration for 2Q PG Conf ends on November 2!

It is going to be the third year of this conference coming to Chicago, and I can guarantee it will be even better than before. There are several reasons for that.

First, we are back to W hotel in the Loop, which is a very convenient location for those of you who work in Chicago and commute from the suburbs – very close to both Union Station and Ogilvie.

Second – there was a record number of submissions, and the best of the best were selected to be presented.

Third – guess who will be presenting the Ultimate Optimization Training?! Yes, your’s truly. 

Now add to this list all of the advantages of a local conference. No airfare. No hotel charges. No travel time. Perhaps, if it would be up to you, you would not mind a getaway:). But I can guarantee that your manager would love an idea of sending you to the local conference, rather than to San Francisco!

And now, I have a world for Chicago PUG members. As a reminder, we are going to have a very special meetup on November 12: Magnus Hagander and Devrim Gündüz will be presenting! Those are two great reasons to attend in November, but there is one more: we are going to reveal a special discount code for Chicago PUG members. 

Please register early for both of these exciting events!

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PostgreSQL And Academia

Recently I’ve been thinking a lot about relationships between the PostgreSQL community and the DB research community. To put it bluntly – these two communities do not talk to each other!

There are many reasons why I am concerned about this situation. First, I consider myself belonging to both of these communities. Even if right now I am 90% in industry, I can’t write off my academic past and writing a scientific paper with the hope of being accepted to the real database conference is something which appeals to me.

Second, I want to have quality candidates for the database positions when I have them. The problem is more than scientists do not speak at the Postgres conferences, and Postgres developers do not speak at the academic conferences. The bigger problem is that for many CS students, their academic research and practical experience to not intersect at all! They study some cool algorithms, and then they practice their SQL on MySQL databases, which as I have already mentioned multiple times, lacks so many basic database features, that it hardly can be considered a database!

If these students practiced using PostgreSQL, they would have a real full-scale object-relational database, not a “light” version, but a real thing, which supports tons of index types, data types, constraints, has procedural language, and the list can go on and on.

It is especially upsetting to see this disconnect since so many database researches were completed on Postgres, for Postgres, with the help of Postgres; R-trees and GIST indexes, to name a couple. Also, the SIGMOD Test of Time Award in 2018 was given to the paper “Serializable isolation for snapshot databases”, which was implemented in Postgres.

I know the answer to the question “why they do not talk?” Researches do not want to talk at the Postgres conferences, because those are not scientific conferences, and the participation in these conferences will not result in any publication. Postgres developers do not want to talk at the CS conferences, because they do not like to write long papers :), and also, even if they do submit something, their papers often are rejected as “not having any scientific value.”

I know the answer. But I do not like it :). So maybe – we can talk about it?!

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