Tag Archives: ORM

February Chicago PUG – what the conversation was about

It’a almost time for our March PUG, and I never blogged about the February one, I guess now it’s as good as any other, especially because  the March PUG is just several days away, and as usual I hope to attract more people to our next event

As for the February PUG,  I really liked it, even though I managed to completely mess up and accidentally cancelled the meetup! I am still not used to the new Meetup editor. Nevertheless, perhaps it was even better, that I’ve made people to re-confirm their participation at the last minute.

I was presenting our most recent work –  a new framework for efficient communications between a database and a web application. My favorite topic; and I was super -excited to share our success. And I was very glad, that one of our application developers decided to stay for the PUG, because very soon all the questions merged into one big question: what did you do to make it happen? What did it take to change the developers mindset? How did we pull it all together?

And my coworker started to describe, how we did it. And I’ve realized, that I almost forgot about many obstacles, which we had overcome. How many things didn’t work from the very beginning. How many “extra miles” we had to walk in both directions.

Answering the comments on one of my previous posts on that topic: it’s just not so easy to write a “matrix” of decisions which would automatically replace the ORM. Most of the time it’s a customized development. If an app developer would always know that method A involves three joins on a database side, and method B pulls the attributes from the same table as  method C… then probably they won’t start using ORM from the very beginning. But the purpose of ORM is to hide these details!

It’s not easy to do things differently, Especially in a small startup. With all the deadlines, and with clear understanding that there is a potential slowdown in development. But we all tried to do the right thing – as a team. I give a credit to myself for coming up with a framework which at the end of the day is easy and convenient to use in the application. And I give even a bigger credit to the whole team for willingness to work through all the issues toward the best solution.

My fellow chicagoans! If by now you feel sorry you missed the February PUG – please consider coming to the March PUG upcoming Wednesday!  Johnathan Katz from Crunchy Data  will be presenting the talk “An Introduction to Using PostgreSQL with Docker & Kubernetes”. We expect another “bridging the gap” event 🙂

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The second rejected paper

****Reposting because the previous version didn’t get  shared on LinkedIn****

Object-relational impedance mismatch is by far my favorite research topic, mostly due to the fact that it has a very practical implementation. I would make even stronger statement: the most rewarding optimization is the one when you can reduce the number of SQL statements executed when a web page is rendered and all of a sudden it is loaded 50 times faster (and I mean actually 50 times, not figuratively speaking!).  It always looks like a magic – and I haven’d done anything!

This been said, the ORMs are my worst enemies, and I am always looking for opportunities to promote the better ways of communication between a database and an applications. Most of the time the human factor appears to be more important than the technological challenges, so I always think about these projects as battles.

At Braviant however, first time in my professional career I had nobody to fight about this issue – the app developers were completely on board with my approach since day one. Which allowed us to develop something really cool, and to optimize the interaction between databases and application to the point of absolute perfection. SO, when my husband suggested we’d write a short paper about this project, I had no doubt it will be accepted – because two of my previous papers on the same subject were accepted to the very serious conferences.

Life proved me wrong :), I am not going to name the conference and the workshop, but I have to make some comments about the reviews, so that the level of my frustration can be understood.

One of the reviewers asked: why we think that the number of round trips defines the response time of the web application. Another reviewer asked, whether we tried to use Mongo DB :))). And why we think that (de) serialization of the JSON takes negligible time. And why we think Hibernate is worse.

I think the only valid objection was, that the topic of the paper is not relevant to the workshop topic.  And the latter might explain the whole story.

Several years ago, when I started to attend the database conferences again, after fifteen years of absence, I made an observation that a significant number of the attendees never saw the real applications, and never had deal with performance problems, Fortunately, I’ve also met and got to know some really outstanding researches, whom I admire and feel honored to be aquatinted with, so… I am sure I will find the right place to showcase our work.

And may be it’s time to get back to my old “HDAT” workshop idea,,,

And for my fellow Chicagoans: I will be presenting this work this Tuesday, Feb 13 at the Chicago PUG meetup!

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The second rejected paper: the ORIM again

Object-relational impedance mismatch is by far my favorite research topic, mostly due to the fact that it has a very practical implementation. I would make even stronger statement: the most rewarding optimization is the one when you can reduce the number of SQL statements executed when a web page is rendered and all of a sudden it is loaded 50 times faster (and I mean actually 50 times, not figuratively speaking!).  It always looks like a magic – and I haven’d done anything!

This been said, the ORMs are my worst enemies, and I am always looking for opportunities to promote the better ways of communication between a database and an applications. Most of the time the human factor appears to be more important than the technological challenges, so I always think about these projects as battles.

At Braviant however, first time in my professional career I had nobody to fight about this issue – the app developers were completely on board with my approach since day one. Which allowed us to develop something really cool, and to optimize the interaction between databases and application to the point of absolute perfection. SO, when my husband suggested we’d write a short paper about this project, I had no doubt it will be accepted – because two of my previous papers on the same subject were accepted to the very serious conferences.

Life proved me wrong :), I am not going to name the conference and the workshop, but I have to make some comments about the reviews, so that the level of my frustration can be understood.

One of the reviewers asked: why we think that the number of round trips defines the response time of the web application. Another reviewer asked, whether we tried to use Mongo DB :))). And why we think that (de) serialization of the JSON takes negligible time. And why we think Hibernate is worse.

I think the only valid objection was, that the topic of the paper is not relevant to the workshop topic.  And the latter might explain the whole story.

Several years ago, when I started to attend the database conferences again, after fifteen years of absence, I made an observation that a significant number of the attendees never saw the real applications, and never had deal with performance problems, Fortunately, I’ve also met and got to know some really outstanding researches, whom I admire and feel honored to be aquatinted with, so… I am sure I will find the right place to showcase our work.

And may be it’s time to get back to my old “HDAT” workshop idea,,,

And for my fellow Chicagoans: I will be presenting this work this Tuesday, Feb 13 at the Chicago PUG meetup!

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The joy of team work!

Last week I had to work a lot! I mean, A LOT! But work-wise that was one of the happiest weeks, and I wanted to share with everybody why it felt so happy.

Those of you who worked with me before know, that my favorite activity is working with  applications, because optimizing for applications is way more difficult and way more fun than optimizing reports. Yes, you can impress everybody, including yourself, reducing the report run time from one hour to one minute. But how much cooler is it to reduce the page load time from 30 sec to 0.1 sec?!  Especially when you have a power not only to write the best queries ever, but also to design the data model “the right way”.

When you do the application database work, the most critical part is to work in close contact with the  application developers. And depending on what kind of team you are lucky or unlucky to have, it may be the best or the worst part of your professional experience.

My IT team here in Braviant is one of the best I ever worked with, which was proved one more time last week. The most difficult part has always been connecting the db work and the app work, like: I’ve selected all this data for you, can you read it from the output I am providing? Or: we can give you all input parameters that way, can you process them? Our app developers have already made a huge step “in my direction” agreeing not to use ORM, but to read the output of the database function. Next step – we hit the  wall exactly where I expected. I’ve spent a half of Saturday writing my code, so that the app developers could start using in Monday morning… and now they are saying they can’t process correctly the embedded record sets! I’ve heard that many times before, and each time in a couple of hours I would hear: Hettie, there is no way! Let’s do it “the old way”, we know how… That time, however my team kept trying to find a solution, and watching these efforts made me to start thinking how I can change the output on my side. After several iterations going back and forward, we came up with a pretty neat way to return the records, which could be used right away, and even a better approach, which, however would require more work from me, and could not be done on the spot.

And you know – I totally understand, when people hate rewriting one piece of code multiple times, which makes me appreciate even more the willingness to rewrite later, when I will come up with the more automated solution from my side…

I have already written a lot in this post, and I am not sure whether it all make sense, but let me try to summarize.  I loved that everybody were willing to compromise, to make adjustments, that there were no “just because” statements, that the whole team was focused on the goal to build the application right from the very beginning, so that we won’t need to worry about performance six months down the road.

Hope it will continue that way.  Except of me working on Saturdays part 🙂

 

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The March Chicago PUG meetup is coming, and I am advertising myself again!

I have at least two optimization posts in my Drafts, but today I wanted to remind everybody, that Thursday (not Wednesday!) is the day for the next Chicago PUG.

So, for those of you, who vaguely remember my talks “Why the databases are slow?”,  for those of you who at some point of your work lives had fun working with me on web applications, for those, with whom we had all these extended arguments about “what databases can do better”… that’s your chance to experience it again :).

And for those of you, who never heard this talk… well, it’s your chance to find out for the first time, why databases are slow!

Here is the event:

https://www.meetup.com/Chicago-PostgreSQL-User-Group/events/237300112/

and if you plan to attend, please RSVP, otherwise I can’t guarantee there will be enough pizza!!!

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I am going to be a panelist at the ChicagoSC event

This post is mostly for my Chicago colleagues, but who knows? May be somebody from nearby could also come.

Please check out this event: Panel: ORM’s and Data Management. I will be one of for panelists, and the topic of ORM and ORIM is near and dear to my heart, as all of you know! So I am very excited about this event and honored to be a part of this panel. Please try to  attend :)!

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Finally many -many months later – our presentation at PG Open 2014

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